How Much Does a Trolling Motor Battery Cost?

If you’ve read our articles about the different kind of trolling motor batteries and where to buy a trolling motor battery the next thing you are probably wondering is: how much does a trolling motor battery cost?

As with any product that has such a wide variety of types and models available, the prices can vary by quite a bit. Remember that within the marine battery category, there are wet-cell, gel and AGM batteries. There are also cranking, deep-cycle and dual-purpose batteries. On top of the different types, there are several major manufacturers and brand names. The batteries are all going to be priced differently depending on the type, the brand, the amp rating, reserve capacity, etc. Prices may also vary depending on where you are shopping. By shopping online, you may be able to avoid sales tax or earn a cash back rebate, but by shopping at a retail store you may be able to score a coupon or hit upon a special sale.

Even with the vast price differences that exist, there is a pretty consistent range that covers the majority of good-quality trolling motor batteries.

Based on our research, the lower end of the price range seems to consistently fall around the $75 mark. You’ll be hard pressed to find a decent battery for much less than that. For example, the least expensive battery that Walmart offers is the wet-cell EverStart 27DC-6 marine battery for $75, though it may occasionally go on sale for a bit less. One of the cheaper batteries that Amazon offers is the Interstate DCM0035. This particular battery has received excellent reviews, but it is relatively small and is ideal only for smaller trolling motors. Bass Pro Shops’ lower end batteries start around $85. Most other retailers, both online and off, seem to start their trolling motor batteries around a similar price point. It’s safe to say that you won’t find a good trolling motor battery for much less than 75 dollars.

On the other end of the spectrum, there are batteries that can cost hundreds of dollars. These aren’t going to be the traditional wet-cell batteries but rather more advanced batteries like AGM, gel or dual purpose batteries. They can range anywhere from $100 to $350 each. A quick survey of a few websites shows that Amazon offers an AGM battery by VMAX that is priced at over $350. For that kind of money, you are paying for superior performance! Bass Pro Shops also offers more expensive trolling motor batteries, with their top of the line offering priced at over $250.

The old saying goes that “You Get What You Pay For” and while that’s always been a hotly debated quotation, it may have never been more hotly debated than when it comes to trolling motor batteries. Many fisherman will agree with the statement and argue that a more expensive battery is generally higher quality. Higher quality equals a better build and better performance. Better performance means it runs your electronics better, for longer. Higher quality batteries discharge slower and recharge faster, keeping you out on the water where you want to be. More expensive may mean that you are paying for the convenience of the battery being maintenance free.

On the other hand, there is a large group of fishermen and boat owners that says you don’t always get what you pay for. They argue that a less expensive battery is capable of performing just as well as a battery that is priced twice as expensive or that you may just be paying for the name on the side. Still others would argue that the performance may not be quite equal, but that the performance of the cheaper battery is simply good enough! Not everyone needs all the latest features and options, some guys just want the battery to do the work, and that’s it.

How much you end up spending on your trolling motor battery is going to come down to your personal preferences, what you value and your individual needs. Obviously, a more powerful battery is going to cost more, so guys with bigger motors and lots of electronics that want to stay out on the water for as long as possible will opt for a higher end battery. Guys with smaller boats, smaller motors or smaller wallets, may be perfectly content to get by with a less expensive battery. No matter which camp you fall in, you should be prepared to shell out at least $75 and possibly up into the $300 – $400 range for a good battery.